Never thought I’d ever cry for a cow…

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A couple coworkers/friends of mine and I went to see this movie called “Sheek-gek” (in hangul 식객) which I can’t find the translation into English. In Naver’s dictionary, it says it means “a dependent;a hanger-onpl. hangers-on》;a parasite I don’t know what this has to do with the flick since it was a battle between two chefs over who would prevail as the best culinary artist. The bad guy of course lost in the end & it had your typical plot where the good guy was disgraced at the beginning, fought the entire movie to prevail in the end.

Despite the very typical or common plot, it was still enjoyable to watch. There were plenty of humorous scenes in it. Also, Korean cinema has come a long way — probably starting with Taeguki where they spent about $13 million for the movie; you can tell they spent a bit on this film including using much better quality media. In the past…as recent as 10 years ago, Korean cinema seemed to use B quality or even less expensive film to record & show their movies. However, the cinematic experience is a bit more impressive these days than in the recent past.

While some of the story was quite predictable, I didn’t expect the “good guy” in the movie to sacrifice his prized possession which at one point was compared to his “little brother.” I think most of the audience cried over the cow more than they did even for the death of his grandfather who was a pained character from the beginning. If they ever put subtitles in this Korean film, I think it would be a good export to other countries. While somewhat unrealistic in many parts of the story, it was what the doctor ordered: an entertaining story between a bad guy & good guy over a familiar topic — cooking.

1 Comment

Filed under Cinema, Entertainment, Food, Reviews

One response to “Never thought I’d ever cry for a cow…

  1. Lee

    I guessed that 식객 means ‘dining person’ as a direct translation of the hanja, because 승객 = passenger
    and 방문객 = visitor

    Haven’t asked Heather about it though

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