My cell phone was hijacked by Russian spies…

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Cell phones are amazing these days. I had to go shopping for a new one today (story down below) and thought to myself, the phone needed:

  • high quality camera — at least 3.0 megapixels
  • MP3 player
  • could be read in English (despite being in Korea)
  • had good software to download the photos & other things off my phone & upload the songs (my last phone had terrible software & I basically wasn’t able to do anything with the pics or the music on there)
  • had an organizer
  • if lucky, was inexpensive…

However, when I thought about it for a bit, I thought “wow, phones are truly becoming all in one & able to do so many functions.” Here’s some other functions I’m sure I’ll be asking it to do in the future:

  • ability to clean my room while I’m out working
  • do all the reading I’ve been meaning to do for the past few weeks
  • finish off a book I’ve been neglecting for the past month
  • and one realistic function that I’ve actually heard some software may do is schedule appointments with clients or friends in the the future using their schedules and mine

So, here’s the boring story about going and looking for the phone:

I had to go look for a new cell phone today. Since I got an SK “T” points credit card recently, I thought I would check out SK phones first. I also was paying into an SK plan for the past year & they are the dominant cell phone service provider in Korea…so I thought what the heck? Well, after paying my final bill, I asked about getting a new phone & they said I can’t since I’m a foreigner.

Of course I know I can, but for a bit, they tell me I need to bring some special document called the 외국인 등록증 (weh-gook-een deung-rok-jeung). I knew that my Alien Registration Card should suffice, but it took a couple calls to another office for the girl to finally figure it out. Not the friendliest of gals despite my great customer service experiences in other places (see the Post Office post regarding great customer service). Anyway, she tells me I have to pay about 50,000 won at least just to start the plan.

I end up going to the service center soon thereafter because seriously, my phone was NOT hijacked by spies, but rather it was basically dysfunctional after being dropped at high speeds. I can’t really explain here as to why and how, but let’s just say I can’t turn it on right now. The rep at the service center basically said in Korean “it’s dead.” He told me this after I waited around a bit bored out of my mind and getting attitude from the Korean girl up front in this futuristic building they use as the service center. It looked like they put more money in this facility than they did with the payment center & the technicians were in the front doing their thing. A bit different from my experiences in Seattle.

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Filed under Business, Business practices, Humorous, Interesting..., Telecommunications

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